Employment and financial stability services from Sacramento Urban League.

Regardless of age, race, or background, the Urban League of Sacramento works to help struggling individuals. There may be referrals to emergency aid available, however the focus is on employment, education, and self-sufficiency. The Sacramento office is part of the nationwide network focused on those that are less fortunate.

The non-profit offers a number of services to low-income and working poor residents of Sacramento. These services include referrals to financial aid. While direct financial assistance will not be offered, the League can serve as a resource and information center. This may include rent, heating-bill resources and other government benefits. There may also be funds disbursed to help pay for a portion of expenses incurred by job-searches. They also have information on housing programs.

One of the key services in the county, available by referral, is the tenant base rental assistance (TBRA). This aims to reduce or help tenants avoid homelessness by helping clients achieve and maintain stability in their current home or apartment.

In addition to promoting housing stability, the Urban League acts as a bridge to either long-term assistance programs, such as Section 8 housing choice vouchers, or self-sufficiency. Participation in some form of case management is conditional to receiving any type of support from the League. Note that the federally funded TBRA is a needs-based service rather than an entitlement program.

In partnership with other agencies, Sacramento Urban League also features a housing division that helps income qualified clients transition from rental housing to homeownership. The division also conducts workshops to help clients develop and grow. It covers financial literacy, credit repair, and similar activities. The intent is to help clients understand how to build wealth.

Furthermore, the HPAP home purchase assistance program offers low-and-moderate-income individuals and families the opportunity to purchase affordable housing somewhere in the state of California.

Qualified applicants can receive information on available grants. Or there may be low income loans used as a form of financial assistance. All funds need to be used to purchase single-family houses, condominiums or maybe an approved cooperative apartments. In addition to that, funds from HPAP funds can be used for paying a portion of closing costs.

 

 

 

The Urban League notes that loan amounts are determined by a combination of factors, including the individual’s income, the amount of assets that applicants have, household size, and down payment provided. All loan recipients are required to maintain their properties in compliance with state or local housing codes.

Housing programs help people become first-time homeowners. The federal government may from time to time issue grants that can provides eligible applicants with matching closing-cost funds.

Applicants can select a first trust lender of their choosing. In order to be eligible for any type of home purchasing grant, individuals seeking help must meet all guidelines and there of course needs to be funding available. Applicants must also be first-time homebuyers, have sufficient income to afford a mortgage loan on their own from a private lender and possess good credit ratings.

The Urban League of Sacramento often has information on local low income energy bill assistance programs, such as LIHEAP. This type of government aid is for households that need help paying electric, winter heating and gas bills. Through the program, struggling residents can apply for yearly cash grants to help pay a wide variety of utility bills. Applicants must provide requisite paperwork to be approved for assistance.

The non-profit organization has also partnered with the local utility companies and even water suppliers to help needy families pay their energy bills during times of financial crisis. Eligible residents can contact the agency for suggestions or referrals on how to apply for financial assistance once during a program year.

The League administers a career center that provides a broad array of employment services. The objective of the activities is to connect employers with community residents seeking jobs.

The center offers training, job-referral, workshops on resume-preparation and work-readiness classes. The format will vary, however there can be individual or small-group sessions available. It also allows free use of computers and internet access too.

 

 

 

 

One key service for both employers and job seekers is First Source Sacramento. This will try to match hiring companies with those that are looking for employment, and service as a clearinghouse for this activity.

In addition, Sacramento Urban League hosts or sponsors dedicated job fairs with local partners. They work with other community-based organizations and businesses to recruit a target population for the specific sponsoring business. The agency also sponsors general job fairs, allowing various companies, non-profit organizations, businesses and government entities to exhibit and recruit community residents.

GED training is provided by the Urban League too. It is available for Sacramento California residents over the age of 18, and it can provide them with reading, math, and other skills that could lead to higher employment.

Hunger is addressed in northern California from key partners of the League, such as pantries and community action agencies. One key resource is the commodity supplemental food program. As resources allow, this government benefit provides nutritious food at no cost to needy recipients. most of the aid is for children, single moms, and seniors. The non-profits that are involved in this in the Sacramento County region will distribute a free grocery bag of food on a monthly basis to community residents enrolled in the program.

The focus is on senior citizens 60 years of age or older pregnant women, women who have given birth in the past year, and children up to six years of age. They may all be eligible for the assistance program. All clients must meet income guidelines and be certified to participate.

 

 

 

It will usually only last for a matter of months. Then, in order to be re-certified, individuals must visit one of the offices and prove their need. They will also need to bring photo identification, birth certificates for children under six years of age, proof of date of birth for senior citizens and other supporting documentation. The commodity supplemental food program is funded by the federal government.

For more information, the Sacramento office of the Urban League can be reached at 3725 Marysville Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95838. The main number is 916.286.8600.

 

 

 

 

 

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