One-Stop Career Centers job training and employment opportunities.

Individuals can receive support from One-Stop Career Centers. There are locations in every state and they were created as part of the Workforce Investment Act. If you are unemployed, or need a better job, the centers offer a number of services to those who need help.

A range of assistance programs are offered to job seekers at one central location as part of the One-Stop Career Centers. While additional details on some of the services offered are below, some examples include career counseling, job training referrals, miscellaneous employment-related services and access to job listings. You can stop by a center to meet with a case manager or specialist, or call a location by you. Some of the locations provide services remotely over the internet as well.

Improve your skills from a variety of classes and workshops. Many locations offer English as second language (ESL) classes. Or sign up for money management and/or credit counseling. Other classes can include work readiness and advice on how to best take advantage of on-the-job training opportunities.

Occupational training can help people get the basic skills for a job in a new field. One-Stop Career Centers may directly offer, or coordinate with local employers, apprenticeships, on-the-job and vocational training, mentoring, and more. If you are trying to find a job in a so called high demand occupation, then you can apply for a grant to use to pay for additional training in one of these fields.

Referrals to colleges and information on the right school to attend for your field can be located as well. The centers allow customers the ability to search for schools and organizations that provide education, occupational and job training opportunities to students. You can also get information on scholarships and educational grants that can help you pay for this education.

Adult Education is offered. This can be for people looking to renter the workforce, the unemployed or it can be for senior citizens. For example, clients over the age of 55 can explore the Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP). The program will allow people to work part time so they can gain experience and also a little bit of income.

 

 

 

 

GED and high school diploma resources are available. If you have never finished high school and want to get your GED, you can get information on the process. Learn the facts on how to study for the GED, where you can take it, and more.

Many of the centers offer classes that can help students of any age prepare for the GED test and specialists can guide you through the process. Locations may also hold works shops or offer clients one on one tutoring to help them pass any tests. Studies show that after someone gets their GED it will open doors for them. They will more than likely be able to find better jobs, increase their income or even further their education. GED preparation classes are offered in almost all states.

The Adult Basic Skills program can provide individuals the opportunity to improve their writing, reading, and general math skills. The services are free to all qualified clients. In addition, if English isn't your first language, then there are ESL classes that people can sign up for as indicated above. The teachers and volunteers at the One-Stop Career Centers can help you learn how to read, write and understand English. Or they can help you improve any of these skills. These classes can be open to immigrants as well as non-English speakers as well.

One of the main goals is to help people develop skills so they can accurately complete a job application, find a job, learn computer skills, get a GED, and even learn how to become a U.S. citizen. Many adults may find it difficult to go back to school, so teachers are well trained in providing assistance.

The National Work Readiness Credential is offered across the country. It is a web-based assessment that uses real-world scenarios and examples in order to demonstrate that job candidates have the basic workplace skills that most employers list as essential. The focus is on entry-level work which can help people set foot into a new job. Candidates obtaining the National Work Readiness Credential can help prove to employers that they have the knowledge, skills and ability to succeed in entry-level jobs, regardless of the field.

Computer Based Training is also offered and is critical to obtaining a well paying job in today’s workplace. Understanding the ins and outs of the latest software and computer systems can open up doors for candidates. Considering that many schools and centers now offer their vocational programs on line, having a computer may help people upgrade their from your own home.

On the Job Training (OJT) will usually be available in partnership with local employers, government agencies, or non-profit organizations. OJT is a subsidized employment opportunity which will place an individual with an employer. Once hired by a private or public company, the candidate will receive training that provides them with the knowledge/skills essential to perform the job adequately and to meet the employer’s expectations.

 

 

 

Vocational education classes are yet another way for people to learn the skills needed for today’s high demand occupations. This includes, but is not limited to, electronic technology, nursing, medical technician, truck driving, medical/dental assistant, computer programming, construction trades, and other occupations. Many of these higher demand occupations offer employees good, livable wages and also career advancement opportunities.

Resume review and interviewing skills can be enhanced at a center. Clients will be able to meet with a staff member to go over and improve their resume. Or when you have that first job interview lined up go through a practice trial run in order to get experience and feedback.

Apprenticeships are yet another valuable resource. Qualified clients can learn a highly skilled occupation through a local and regional apprenticeship program with local employers. These programs operate in most states, town, and counties. They are also generally operated on a voluntary basis by a "sponsor", which will be a local employer.

The One-Stop Career Center program and system is available nationwide. It is coordinated and run in partnership with the federal government Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration (ETA). To get more information, or to find a center near you, dial 877-872-5627, or use the state list below.

Career center locations and state employment programs

Alabama

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Florida

Georgia

Illinois

Indiana

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New York

North Carolina

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

South Carolina

Tennessee

Texas

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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