Assistance from Los Angeles Community Action Board.

Referrals and financial help from Los Angeles Community Action Board is wide ranging, and they partner with the Department of Social Services and other non-profits on assisting the less fortunate. The organization can refer individuals to emergency financial aid, government grants, state programs such as CalFresh and other benefits. There may be low income housing, funds for paying rent as part of ESG Homeless Services, and more. However, the focus of the agency is on education, stability, and self-sufficiency. More details on their programs are below. Call (866) 613-3777 for referrals and intake.

Housing resources in Los Angeles

There are a number of Permanent Housing Programs administered by non-profits across southern California, and they often go by the name of Homeless Services. They can offer support to the formerly homeless that are now self-sufficient. In other words, they provide the last step of the rehousing process. Non-profits, often in partnership with Los Angeles Community Action Board, manage a number of apartments and single-family dwellings for low-income families.

There are units for seniors, the disabled, and single parents with children. These are available as well as many others in the Los Angeles County area. In some cases, there may be funds issued to pay for a portion of the security deposit or first month’s rent. Some of the program guidelines and expectations include.

  • Clients must meet the homeless and low-income guidelines set forth by HUD. They need to pay the rent on time, and some clients may in fact have a Section 8 Voucher.
  • Tenants are expected to pay their own water bills, utilities gas, electricity, and other expenses, including of course rent.
  • All rules and regulations must be adhered too.

The Weatherization Assistance Program enables low-income or working poor families to permanently reduce their energy bills by making their homes more energy efficient. It is even more effective for any older housing stock in southern California.




Los Angeles Community Action Board and its partners have operated the Program for many years in the area, and countless households have been assisted since then. Families receiving the free weatherization services see their annual energy bills reduced by an average of about $300, depending on the price of fuel prices at that time.

Due to the fact that the energy improvements that make up weatherization services are long lived, the savings for a homeowner will add up over time. So families can save hundreds of dollars on their utilities over the years. There are other substantial benefits for weatherization clients and their communities.

For example, the conservation activities reduce energy consumption for households they also improve the health and safety of the families. Other benefits can be experienced too. The community action agency and its contractors may arrange for the following.

  • Adding extra Insulation of attic, floor, wall, water heater and exposed pipes.
  • Window and door repairs or replacement.
  • Weather stripping and caulking.
  • Repairs for heating or cooling units and furnaces.
  • Free energy saving compact fluorescent bulbs.
  • Contractors will check major appliances for occupant safety and also energy savings.

Emergency aid for bills, rent, and expenses in Los Angeles

There are a few California mandated cash assistance programs from the Department of Social Services. Many of these are also offered statewide. They include the following.

  • -Short term cash aid is from General Relief. It is for Los Angeles County families that do not qualify for other benefits. The disabled can also be assisted by the Supplemental Security Income Medi-Cal Advocacy Program.
  • -CalWORKs – This is for families with children that need help with paying bills or food costs while they work or are in job training.
  • -CAPI - Cash Assistance Program for Immigrants is for the elderly or disabled, and it is in addition to any SSI payments they receive.

Emergency Eviction Prevention resources are available in the county as part of Homeless Services as well. The Department of Social Services as well as various non-profits can provide information. They are targeted toward those individuals and families who are behind on their rent and facing eviction. There is also assistance in the region for those who currently homeless.

The financial assistance could include a number of different approaches, including help with paying rent, mortgage, or security deposit payments on a new apartment in Los Angeles. The intent of the program is to either assist in moving people out of a homeless situation or, in a perfect world, prevent a homeless (whether foreclosure or eviction) situation from occurring in the first place.





The services are mostly funded by Housing and Urban Development. Other sources of funds include CSBG, Homeless Services Continuum of Care or emergency solution grants. The intent was to stabilize individuals and families in their existing homes. Or if that is not possible, then to shorten the amount of time that individuals and families stay in shelters. There may also be help for individuals and families with securing affordable housing.

Other components of the housing solutions may include loans for one time rental or utility bill assistance and supportive services directly related to the prevention of homelessness. Throughout this process the client will need to attend case management services.

Los Angeles Community Action Board also works to address hunger. They partner with the Department of Social Services on referring people to CalFresh for low cost groceries or nutritional education. In addition, the disabled or senior citizens can enroll into the Restaurant Meals program, which actually allows the low income to buy meals at a restaurant using an EBT Card.

The federal Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program is designed to help families in Los Angeles that meet low income guidelines. A focus is on elderly, the disabled, or households with young children. Grants can help households keep their electricity on, especially those families that are most vulnerable. Funds from LIHEAP and the government primarily assist individuals by applying a utility bill assistance grant directly to the energy provider on behalf of the qualified household.

There are both Energy Credits (EC) as well as an Emergency Crisis Intervention. The amount of the credit or financial aid given to each household varies each year. In some instances, applications are taken throughout the year, both in the winter and summer. Funds may be offered for paying both cooling and heating bills in the region.

Education and job placement assistance from Los Angeles Community Action Board

Greater Avenues for Independence (GAIN) from Los Angeles Community Action Board is for CalWORKs participants. The goal is to help the client both find and prepare for a job, or a better one. They can enroll into training, remedial education, and even get referrals to work attire. Similar is GROW, or General Relief Opportunities for Work, which is for residents that receive assistance from General Relief.

Head Start is a state of California as well as national program that aims to promote school readiness in the region’s youngest children. Children that qualify can enter Head Start at age 3 or 4 in the fall and continue for one or two years in the program.

There are various resources available. For example, Each Head Start center is designed to meet the needs of the children, families and cultures that they serve. Components of it include High Quality Education, Disability Services and Support, Family Case Management, and an Individualized Curriculum is developed for each child.

There are also Meal Plans and Health Screening and assistance, such as Dental, Vision and Hearing provided. Families who receive public assistance from the state of California or other benefits may also be eligible.




Family Self-Sufficiency Services, or FSS, is a program of the Los Angeles Community Action Board. It enables individuals and families who meet the federal government poverty level guidelines to achieve and sustain self-sufficiency by overcoming barriers to employment.

Staff will help them with eliminating behaviors that have resulted in long term dependency. The program focuses on improving the ability of employable family members to become job ready. FSS and the case managers will also help clients develop social competence to improve their lifestyle and everyday living conditions.

VITA is coordinated by DPSS of Los Angeles and community action. It provides low income clients with free tax advice and preparation services. Staff also address issues such as Child Tax Credit, the EITC Earned Income Tax Credit, and provide other support.

For more information on these or other Los Angeles services, dial (866) 613-3777.






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